CTCL Hosting a Webinar on Automating Voter Address Updates

Voter registration modernization isn’t only (or even mostly) about registering new voters. It’s also about keeping voter rolls up-to-date, improving the accuracy of election data, and saving time for governments and voters. Across the country the voter registration process is being modernized in different ways at motor vehicle agencies and other agencies covered by the National Voter Registration Act (NVRA). And how these different modernizations get implemented continues to be a topic of conversation for election officials, advocates, and policy makers.

Led by Judd Choate, State Election Director in Colorado, and Chris Harvey, State Election Director in Georgia, this webinar will introduce the efficiency, cost-savings, and security advantages of automated voter address updates. We’ll also discuss some state-by-state comparisons on different approaches to implementing automated voter address updates without new legislation.  

Registration is free and all are welcome.

Key topics of the webinar include:

  • Broad strokes mechanisms & nuances of how it works

  • Data flow between agencies and levels of government

  • Advantages of automated voter address updates including efficiency, cost-savings, and security

  • State-by-state comparisons on different approaches

When

Thursday, February 28th

1:00pm - 1:45pm CT

CTCL Hosting a Webinar on Voter Registration Data Transfer

Modernizing voter registration processes at motor vehicle agencies and other agencies covered by the National Voter Registration Act (NVRA) is one of the hottest topics of discussion today among state and local elections officials, state legislators, voter advocacy groups, and now Congress.

Led by Edgardo Cortés, David Franks, and John Lindback, this webinar will look beneath the surface of this hot topic to uncover the data needed to modernize voter registration and how it can be safely and securely transferred from one agency to another. We’ll also discuss the data you’ll need to evaluate the success of modernization projects.

By the end of the webinar, you’ll know more about:

  • What data resides in voter registration, DMV, and Medicaid databases

  • What data is needed to streamline and modernize the voter registration process

  • How data transfers work in modernized systems

  • What constitutes “success” for a new system and the data needed to measure success



CTCL Hosting a Webinar About Testing Voter Registration Modernizations

As an election official, you’ve probably been part of software development projects where you’ve felt like an outsider in the process. Sometimes the people in IT seem to speak a different language when it comes to important details.

In this free webinar, the Center for Technology and Civic Life and our partners at the Center for Civic Design demystify what you need to know about testing electronic data transfer modernizations (and other software projects!). You’ll learn vocabulary and the steps for structuring and monitoring the process, from setting acceptance criteria to testing the user experience.  

In this webinar, you’ll learn how to:

  • Understand software and data quality assurance testing

  • Help ensure voter registration data accuracy by taking ownership over the transfer process

  • Plan and coordinate with your agency partners and the tech team to meet your acceptance criteria

  • Know when and how to contribute your election expertise

  • Use scenarios – small stories – to test the software and the data, and there’s even a formula for writing them





Happy Election Day from CTCL!

Every election throughout the year is special (even if it’s regularly scheduled), but the first Tuesday after the first Monday in November always has a particularly special place in our organization’s heart. This year is no exception, and as a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization, CTCL has worked on civic data efforts to research ballot information from local election offices across the US. This information enables a number of tools to help connect voters to the ballot information they need to make an informed decision when they step into the voting booth.

Here’s a few of the places you’ll see our data as you prepare to head into the voting booth today:

  • Facebook: This election cycle we've renewed our partnership with Facebook to connect all US Facebook users with local ballot information. This year Facebook developed a new and improved candidate information tool that includes direct-to-camera videos from candidates on why they’re running for office, what policy issues they care about, and what they hope to accomplish if elected. All US users have received in Newsfeed nudges prompting them to use the candidate info tool. You can read more here.

  • Google Search: We have also continued our years long partnership with Google to enhance the civic information available on Search. When a user searches for a candidate or office up for election, CTCL’s data is included in Search features that provide useful information about that contest, surface the other candidates competing for that office, and more. More information is available here.

  • Google Civic Information API: CTCL’s data is also available via the Google Civic Information API, which allows organizations to build their own custom tools to connect people with ballot information. Tools built with the ballot information in the API include Get to the Polls from the Voting Information Project, Vote.org’s ballot information feature, and a number of state-specific tools from Rock the Vote.

At CTCL, we believe that putting answers to voters’ most asked questions in the places they already go for information is a powerful way to help people feel confident in navigating the electoral process and ultimately make our democracy stronger. We sincerely thank all of the election officials across the country, without whom none of our efforts would be possible, and all of our partners, large and small, who help get this information into the hands of those who can use it. We hope everyone has an excellent Election Day!

Job: Training Associate - No Longer Accepting Applications

Salary: $45,000  - $50,000 per year
Benefits: Vision, dental, & medical insurance and cell phone reimbursement
Location: Chicago, IL, remote work possible, 10% travel to U.S. election offices and conferences
Type: Full-time
Start date: Winter 2018

Position description

When you think about elections, you might think about popular candidates, “I voted” stickers, and all sorts of paperwork and deadlines. But behind the scenes are thousands of election officials in state and local governments who are working hard to make sure ballots are counted and voices are heard.

To serve every community and make democracy work, these officials need 21st-century tools and training. You can help them get it!

As the CTCL Government Services Training Associate, you will develop and deliver training courses that advance the tech and communication skills of election officials. If you care about democracy, if you believe in the importance of public service, and if you love to exceed expectations, this is the job for you.

Responsibilities

  • Curriculum development - Create course participant guides, slide presentations, and evaluations that address the professional development needs of election officials

  • Training - Deliver in-person and online training in a way that is engaging and informative

  • Research and evaluation - Identify training needs of election officials through industry research and assess effectiveness of courses through participant surveys before and after training

Qualifications

As the Government Services Training Associate, you will have an understanding of CTCL’s mission and demonstrate a proven track record of success. If you’re not familiar with elections or election administration, that’s okay -- what’s most important are your skills as a trainer. You will possess many but not necessarily all of the following skills and qualifications:

  • You are an excellent trainer. You can share ideas concisely and clearly at the front of the room. You can also facilitate exercises and group conversations.

  • You have strong verbal and written communication skills. You can present complex concepts in a way that is easy to understand.

  • You develop training materials like course outlines, participant guides, and slide presentations that are thoroughly researched and clearly structured. You cite your work.

  • You make learning enjoyable. When you teach, you engage people with interesting exercises and discussion questions that put concepts into practice.

  • You know that feedback loops can help you build the best materials. You create opportunities to get input from colleagues and clients.

  • You are thoughtful with your time management and you pay attention to detail. This shows in the quality of work you produce.

  • You are enthusiastic about making elections more secure and inclusive. You believe in democracy and care about voting.

  • You are curious. You are committed to learning new things and developing new skills.

About CTCL

CTCL is a nonprofit that uses technology to improve the way government and communities interact. We do this by providing free and low-cost resources for election officials so they can update the ways they use technology to communicate with the public. We also do this by publishing free, open-source civic datasets that are used in some of the most powerful tools that drive civic participation.

To date, we’ve trained thousands of election officials on topics like social media outreach, election website best practices, and cybersecurity. And we have published civic datasets that answer the questions “What’s on my ballot?” and “Who represents me?” which have been accessed over 200 million times.

Opportunity: Research Partnership--No Longer Accepting Applications

Position: Election Toolkit Research Partner
Honorarium: $10,000
Location: Remote opportunity
Type: Part time
Term: December 1, 2018 - May 1, 2019
Application deadline: November 12, 2018

Position description

Launched in 2016, the Election Toolkit is a collection of free and low-cost tools to promote civic engagement and make voting easier. When used by the Toolkit’s audience of election officials in state and local government, these tools have shaped the experiences of voters throughout the United States.

To better understand the Toolkit’s impact, the Center for Technology and Civic Life (CTCL) is seeking a research partner to design and manage an impact measurement study. As the research partner, you will use both quantitative and qualitative methods to measure the impact of the Election Toolkit on the election officials who use it and the communities they serve. In a final report, you’ll share your findings along with recommendations.

Responsibilities

  • Research and data collection: Design and manage a study to identify who’s using the Election Toolkit, how they’re using it, what results they’re getting from using the tools, and how those results can be seen in their communities

  • Analysis: Identify trends, commonalities, blind spots, and opportunities regarding how election officials use the Toolkit

  • Writing: Draft a final report sharing major findings from the research as well as recommendations

Qualifications

As the Election Toolkit Research Partner, you will have a passion for investigating how American democracy works and an understanding of the Election Toolkit’s mission. In addition, you will possess many but not necessarily all of the following skills and qualifications:

  • You have thoughtful project management skills and attention to detail.

  • You have experience with both quantitative and qualitative research methods. Bonus: you have a background in monitoring, evaluation, and learning (MEL).

  • You have strong verbal and written communication skills. You’re able to synthesize complex data and translate research findings into recommendations.

  • You’re dedicated to delivering honest, comprehensive findings, regardless of whether they’re flattering or hard to hear.

About CTCL

CTCL is a nonprofit that uses technology to improve the way government and communities interact. We do this by providing free and low-cost resources for election officials so they can update the ways they use technology to communicate with the public. We also do this by publishing free, open-source civic datasets that are used in some of the most powerful tools that drive civic participation.

To date, we’ve trained thousands of election officials on topics like social media, election website best practices, and cybersecurity. And we have published civic datasets that answer the questions “What’s on my ballot?” and “Who represents me?” which have been accessed over 200 million times.

The Center for Technology and Civic Life is proud to be an Equal Opportunity Employer. We encourage candidates of all races, colors, religions, national origins, sexual orientations, genders, sexes, ages, abilities, branches of military service, and political party affiliations to apply.

Although this is a remote position, we feel it's best suited for candidates based in the United States. Only if an applicant is an ideal candidate, is able to travel to the U.S., and can easily communicate with people based in the U.S. would we consider a different location.

Questions about the partnership? Reach out to Kurt Sampsel at kurt@techandciviclife.org.

Job: Community Associate - No Longer Accepting Applications

Position: Community Associate
Salary: $45,000  - $50,000 per year
Benefits: Vision, dental, & medical insurance and cell phone reimbursement
Location: Chicago, IL, remote work possible, 5% travel to U.S. election offices and conferences
Type: Full-time
Start date: Winter 2018


Position description

When you think about elections, you might think about popular candidates, “I voted” stickers, and all sorts of paperwork and deadlines. But behind the scenes are thousands of election officials in state and local governments who are working hard to make sure ballots are counted and voices are heard.

To serve every community and make democracy work, these officials need 21st-century tools and training. You can help them get it!

As the CTCL Government Services Community Associate, you will grow and engage our network of election officials (what we call ELECTricity) and connect them with resources like our training courses and the Election Toolkit. If you care about democracy, if you believe in the importance of public service, and if you love to exceed expectations, this is the job for you.

Responsibilities

  • Community-building - Understand the professional needs of election officials by building and communicating with the ELECTricity network via email, phone, and in-person outreach

  • Communications - Share industry best practices by researching and writing about election administration challenges and solutions in a regular e-newsletter and blog posts

  • Customer support - Connect election officials with affordable solutions by listening and responding to their questions and requests for tools, training, and other resources

Qualifications

As the Government Services Community Associate, you will have an understanding of CTCL’s mission and demonstrate a proven track record of success. In addition, you will possess many but not necessarily all of the following qualifications:

  • You have strong verbal and written communication skills. Bonus: You have experience using publishing tools like Mailchimp to send emails and Squarespace to share blog posts.

  • You are passionate about helping people solve problems. You know listening is important.

  • You are thoughtful with your time management and you pay attention to detail. This shows in the quality of work you produce.

  • You are enthusiastic about making elections more secure and inclusive. You believe in democracy and care about voting.

  • You are committed to being a high-performing team member where you learn new things and develop new skills.

About CTCL

CTCL is a nonprofit that uses technology to improve the way government and communities interact. We do this by providing free and low-cost resources for election officials so they can update the ways they use technology to communicate with the public. We also do this by publishing free, open-source civic datasets that are used in some of the most powerful tools that drive civic participation.

To date, we’ve trained thousands of election officials on topics like social media, election website best practices, and cybersecurity. And we have published civic datasets that answer the questions “What’s on my ballot?” and “Who represents me?” which have been accessed over 200 million times.

CTCL Hosting a Webinar About Voter Registration Modernization

Like many government services, voter registration has been streamlined in recent years. Advances in technology have made registering voters faster, simpler, more convenient, and less expensive – all while helping to include more eligible citizens and improve the accuracy of voter records.

Voter registration modernizations like updated Motor Voter programs, electronic transfer of voter registration data from the Department of Motor Vehicles, and automatic voter registration (AVR) are examples of some of the popular new ways of registering voters.

But as these voter registration policies are passed at the state level, local election officials need to understand how their work will change as a result. Equipped with best practices from the field, local offices can be better prepared to adapt to new registration processes.

Are you curious about how an updated voter registration process might impact the work of local election officials? The Center for Technology and Civic Life and the Center for Civic Design invite you to attend a free webinar that will provide you with background on different kinds of voter registration modernizations as well as insights and lessons learned from across the country.

What:

Guidelines on Voter Registration Modernization for Local Election Offices webinar, presented by the Center for Technology and Civic Life and the Center for Civic Design

When:

Thursday, September 27
12:00pm - 1:00pm Central Time


Learn more about the findings we share in the webinar by exploring the newest tool in the Election Toolkit, the Voter Registration Modernization Guide.

And if you are interested in some of the research for this project, read how CTCL brought together election officials and other experts in May 2018 to discuss voter registration modernization.


Job: Operations Manager - Application Closed

Position: Operations Manager
Benefits: Vision, Dental, & Medical Insurance and Cell Phone Reimbursement
Location: Chicago, IL -OR- Washington, DC
Type: Full Time
Salary: $60,000 - $70,000
Application Deadline: October 1, 2018
Start Date: Fall 2018

Position Description

The Operations Manager will be responsible for leading our operational, financial, and administrative functions; overseeing and maintaining a set of internal functions that make it easier for us to hit our goals and for staff to thrive; and serving as the primary go-to for organizational problem solving. This position will report directly to the Executive Director.

Responsibilities

Lead our operational, financial, and administrative functions

  • Lead all administrative and operations activities to ensure smooth day-to-day functioning.

  • Oversee human resource activities, including payroll processing and benefits management.

  • Perform day-to-day financial management, including: processing cash receipts, paying invoices, coding expenses and reimbursements, and closing monthly books with our accountant.

  • Manage contract accountant, independent auditors, and banking relationships. Lead our annual audit.

  • Ensure we are in full legal compliance by maintaining an open line with our lawyers and proactively looking for and flagging potential trouble spots.

  • Manage supplies and equipment.

  • Provide support to the Executive Director in management of vendor relationships, contracts, and records.

Ensure organizational effectiveness

  • Coordinate annual review process.

  • Play a key role in developing agendas for our two annual staff retreats.

  • Coordinate logistics and materials for staff meetings, board meetings, annual convenings or conferences led by the civic data and government services teams, and other events as needed.

  • Serve as the hub of our talent needs by coordinating searches and helping hiring managers identify and recruit great people to join our team.

  • Institutionalize onboarding and off-boarding best practices and materials.

  • Create and maintain various management documents, including our employee manual, job descriptions, training plans, and organizational chart.

  • Support the Executive Director in developing internal processes and driving culture shifts as we grow and mature as an organization.

Serve as the go-to for organizational problem solving

  • Proactively spot and resolve ad hoc challenges that arise.

  • Serve as a thought-partner to our Executive Director and senior leadership team in identifying and resolving organizational or individual challenges as they arise.

  • Identify additional ways in which we could improve and take on other responsibilities as we grow.

Desired Qualifications

A successful candidate for the Operations Manager position will have a comprehensive understanding of our mission and demonstrate a proven track record of success. In addition, while no candidate will possess every quality, the successful candidate will possess many of the following qualifications and personal attributes. Even if you aren’t sure but are excited about the position, we encourage you to apply! 

  • Solutions-oriented: You proactively develop solutions to challenges and push to get past roadblocks.

  • Ownership and hustle: You care deeply about getting results, and you do what it takes to get them, including, anticipating problems, offering creative solutions, driving work forward, and course-correcting when needed.

  • Strong attention to detail: You pay close attention to detail and ensure that any task or work product - big or small - is thorough and accurate.

  • Inclusive: You connect with people from all kinds of backgrounds and make sure everyone feels like they belong here.

  • Strong customer service orientation: You make it easier for staff to do their own jobs. You view your work as supporting the whole by helping to make their lives as easy and straightforward as possible

  • Integrity: You can be trusted with confidential organizational and staff information.

About CTCL

CTCL is a non-partisan, non-profit that uses technology to improve the way local governments and communities interact. We do this by providing free and low-cost resources for local election administrators so they can update the ways they use technology to communicate with voters. We also do this by publishing free, open-source civic datasets that are used in some of the most powerful tools that drive civic participation. 

To date, we’ve built a knowledge network of hundreds of local election administrators through a program we call ELECTricity. And we have published civic datasets that answer questions like 'What’s on my ballot?' and 'Who represents me?', which have been accessed over 200 million times.

Read more about our work here:

To Apply

Applications will be accepted and interviews will be conducted on a rolling basis. To apply:

  1. Submit a short application at https://www.techandciviclife.org/operations-manager-application and email your resume to operations@techandciviclife.org.

  2. People who demonstrate that they are qualified in their application materials will have the opportunity to complete a test.

  3. People who perform well on the test will be asked to participate in an interview(s).

  4. Based on the application, test results, interviews, and reference checks, one person will be selected for the position.

The Center for Technology and Civic Life is proud to be an Equal Opportunity Employer. We encourage people of all races, colors, religions, national origins, sexual orientations, gender identities and expressions, sexes, ages, abilities, branches of military service, and political party affiliations to apply.

CTCL Brings Together Election Officials and Other Experts to Discuss Voter Registration Modernization

Twelve states and the District of Columbia have already approved automatic voter registration, and 20 states have introduced automatic registration proposals in 2018, according to the Brennan Center for Justice.

But how do these new voter registration modernization policies impact the workload and processes of local election officials?

To answer this question, CTCL brought together local election officials and other experts for a 1-day workshop in Chicago on May 11. The workshop was facilitated by the Center for Civic Design.

The goal of the workshop was to develop a set of lessons learned for local election officials tackling the effects of voter registration modernization, taking into account different perspectives in various policy frameworks.

To help us draft our lessons learned, we listened to state case studies and discussions about the areas of election administration that voter registration affects. We recognized that every state's implementation is at a different point, but there's something to learn from everyone's unique experience and perspective.

Participants came from Colorado, Illinois, Rhode Island, Virginia, Vermont, and California. They included:

·    State and local election officials

·    A DMV administrator

·    Advocates and researchers

We kicked off the workshop by jumping into research about the success of voter registration modernization in places like Colorado and Virginia.

Then the heart of the workshop was built around state case studies, group discussion questions, and of course, lots of sticky notes!

Workshop attendees view a wall of sticky notes before voting.

Workshop attendees view a wall of sticky notes before voting.

By the end of the day, these colorful sticky notes were organized on the wall and voted on by attendees. This exercise allowed us to zoom in on the top issues for election officials who are responsible for implementing new voter registration policies.

One of the lessons learned from the workshop focused on having good relationships between election offices and DMV offices.

Norelys Consuegra, Deputy Director of Elections with the Rhode Island Secretary of State, called attention to the importance of partnerships when managing new voter registration processes. She said, “Our goal is for people to really care about elections. We have a great working relationship with the DMV. That’s a big part of AVR.”

Another key lesson was the challenge of communicating the new policy to different audiences like legislators, advocates, and voters.

Overall, the group expressed a positive experience with voter registration modernization -- it saves local election offices and the DMV time and money.

For next steps, CTCL will be collecting additional data from election officials and DMV administrators. We’ll use the lessons learned from the workshop and additional site visits to produce 2 webinars and a tool in the Election Toolkit later this summer. These free resources on best practices will benefit local election officials who are rolling out an update to their voter registration process.

Want to keep up with CTCL’s work on voter registration modernization and other election administration resources? Subscribe to our ELECTricity newsletter.