Jun
7
3:00 pm15:00

2017 Annual Maryland Association of Election Officials

  • Clarion Resort Fountainbleu

Hosted by the Maryland Association of Election Officials, MAEO features a distinguished roster local election officials and Election Boards from all 24 jurisdictions in the State of Maryland. Attendees have the opportunity to be guided through a breakout session and discussion by CTCL's Director of Government Services, Whitney May, and Government Services Associate, Kurt Sampsel, who will provide key insights into free and low-cost tech tools to help election officials engage their communities and improve how elections are run.

Jun
8
9:00 am09:00

2017 Missouri Urban Boards Conference

Hosted by the St. Louis Board of Elections, this annual conference is designed for the education and professional development of Missouri's 6 urban election boards and their staff. Join CTCL's Director of Government Services, Whitney May, and Government Services Associate, Kurt Sampsel for an afternoon session on the Election Toolkit, a collection of free and low-cost tools to help election officials learn new tech skills and expand professional growth.


May
17
May 18

New Media Ventures Summit

  • San Francisco, CA

The New Media Ventures Summit is an annual gathering of leaders in technology, media and politics. The high-energy, interactive event will feature presentations and discussions led by entrepreneurs, funders and thought leaders shaping the future of democracy.

May
17
May 18

Global Election Technology Summit

  • UC Hastings College of the Laws

The GET Summit is a multi-day conference and networking event convening leaders in the rapidly evolving space of election technology. This nonpartisan event provides a forum to build the technology infrastructure that enables innovation in election technology. Attendees include government officials, private industry, academia, media, and civil society organizations. Join CTCL's Director of Government Services, Whitney May, and Director of Civic Data, Donny Bridges, as they lead workshops on the topics of off-the-shelf tools for election offices and common data standards.

May
11
2:45 pm14:45

Association of Election Commission Officials of Illinois

  • Embassy Suites Downtown

At this one-day conference of the Election Commission Officials of Illinois, Kurt Sampsel, Government Services Associate, will give a one-hour presentation on the Election Toolkit. Kurt will discuss how the Toolkit can help election officials in Illinois, will introduce the newly launched Usability Testing Kit tool, and will discuss CTCL's professional development courses.

May
8
9:00 am09:00

MIT Polling Place Technology Workshop

  • Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Hosted by Charles Stewart III at MIT, this is a 1-day workshop about the application of technology to improve polling place practices. The convening is an opportunity for those who were involved in programming around voter wait times to share lessons learned in 2016 and hopes for 2020. Executive Director, Tiana Epps-Johnson, and Director of Government Services, Whitney May, will join Mark Pelczarski to share their experiences with the polling place technology featured in the Election Toolkit.

May
3
11:30 am11:30

Kansas County Clerks and Election Officials Association Annual Conference

  • Hilton Garden Inn

The four-day conference will feature training sessions by county clerks, election officials, and election experts, including CTCL's Director of Government Services, Whitney May, and Government Services Associate, Kurt Sampsel, who will lead a session on free and low-cost election resources that will improve communication with the public, collect important election data, and streamline processes.  

Apr
27
Apr 28

Harford County Training

  • Harford County Board of Elections

Harford County Board of Elections contracted CTCL to do a custom, in-person training for their staff. Director of Government Services, Whitney May, and Government Services Associate, Kurt Sampsel, led staff through over 6 hours of curriculum that covered modern communication topics such as using Twittter to engage voters and improving the Harford County election website.

Apr
11
Apr 13

The Election Officials of Arizona Spring Workshop

  • Tucson Omni Resort

Election Officials of Arizona (EOA) features a distinguished roster local election officials in the State of Arizona. Attendees have the opportunity to be guided through a breakout session and discussion by CTCL's Director of Government Services, Whitney May, and Government Services Associate, Kurt Sampsel, who will provide key insights into free and low-cost tech tools to help election officials engage their communities and improve how elections are run.

Apr
4
1:00 pm13:00

75th Annual Midwest Political Science Association (MPSA) Conference

  • Palmer House Hilton

Over 5,000 political science scholars come to the Annual Midwest Political Science Association conference, and they come from the Midwest, of course, but also from across the country and around the world. The Democracy Fund invited CTCL meet this audience as part of a new Tech Classroom presentation series. We put together a presentation that would introduce the Election Toolkit to this new audience before zeroing in on how the tools can be used for research. With knowledge of the Toolkit and with academic research experience of his own, Government Services Associate Kurt Sampsel represented CTCL at the conference. 

Mar
30
4:00 pm16:00

Women in Civic Tech: Amplifiers of Community Voice

  • DuSable Museum of African-American History

Smart Chicago Collaborative and Chi Hack Night have teamed up to create a speaking series in celebration of Women’s History Month in an effort to elevate the talented, diverse women in civic-driven technology across Chicago. CTCL’s Executive Director, Tiana Epps-Johnson will join a panel of discussion with Andrea Hart (City Bureau) and Aviva Rosman (BallotReady).

Mar
27
9:30 am09:30

CTCL Advisory Committee Kick-Off Meeting

  • Chicago Community Trust

The Center for Technology and Civic Life’s Government Services team organizes a network of election officials who believe that technology can improve our democracy. This looks like training people who work in local government to use technology to promote civic engagement and make voting easier. In early 2017 we recruited an advisory committee of election professionals to help us shape the content of our Government Services professional development courses and expand the reach of CTCL programs. And on March 27, we brought our advisors together for the first time at the Chicago Community Trust.

Mar
15
9:30 am09:30

The Election Verification Network 2017 Annual Conference

  • GWU School of Engineering & Applied Science

CTCL’s Executive Director, Tiana Epps-Johnson, and Director of Government Services, Whitney May, attended the 2017 Election Verification Network (EVN) annual conference in Washington, D.C. This year’s conference theme was “Refocus. Renew. Re-Inspire.” While EVN has organized 11 conferences since 2004, this was CTCL’s first time joining the group. The Election Verification Network brings together election officials, technologists, attorneys, researchers, advocates, and others who are passionate about elections. Together, they “collaborate across disciplines and opinions toward two inseparable goals: voting is accessible, private, reliable and secure; and elections are transparent, accurate and verifiable.”

Jan
17
9:30 am09:30

The Knight-Civic Hall Symposium on Tech, Politics and the Media

The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, in partnership with Civic Hall, hosted the Knight-Civic Hall Symposium on Tech, Politics, and the Media on January 18th. The event brought together a diverse group of experts to reflect on the 2016 election. Over the course of the day, panelists dug into topics like the rise of fake news, the future of polling, and how to address the increasing polarization of the American electorate. CTCL’s Executive Director, Tiana Epps-Johnson, was invited to join a panel focused on civic engagement in the 2016 election. The discussion explored questions like: Are there better ways of engaging people in the public arena? What worked in 2016? What didn’t? Can we make voting, along with other forms of civic participation, more fun? More valuable?